Tag Archives: married

2013/12/941ce_working_in_norway_1543667508_982563367b

Q&A: What did I need to get Married in Norway?

Question by robert: What did I need to get Married in Norway?
She is a citizen of the Philippines and has lived & work in Norway for the last two years, What document’s do we both need to get married, and to bring her to America

Best answer:

Answer by Uncle
Follow the flowcharts here

http://familybasedimmigration.com/forum/index.php

or

http://www.visajourney.com/

http://goscandinavia.about.com/od/norwa1/qt/marriednorway.htm

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Question by Jeffrey: is it legal for a company to withhold more taxes than the employee’s W-4 form requires?
I have submitted a W-4 claiming the maximum allowances because I work in Norway and am liable to their tax rate of 48%. My company is required to pay any taxes in excess of what my tax burden will be in the US. Last year, I paid in excess of $ 40k over what my federal taxes required and was unable to claim a refund. I adjusted my W-4 to reflect my tax liability in the US so that I would not have to pay in excess of what is required. Recently, my company has begun holding out 37% of my wages instead of what is required by my W-4.

Best answer:

Answer by Bobbie
YES it is and when the IRS does issue a lock in letter for this purpose and tells them how much to withhold your employer does NOT have any choice about the amount either OK.
You must withhold tax as indicated in the lock-in letter by the date specified unless we notify you otherwise. This date is 60 days after the date of the lock-in letter. Once a lock-in rate is effective, an employer can’t decrease withholding unless the IRS approves it.

www.irs.gov/Individuals/Employees/Understanding-your-2800C-Letter

Do you know any thing about the below enclosed information when you are filling out your 1040 FIT tax return during the tax filing season for the past tax years at that time.
The foreign earned income exclusion, the foreign housing exclusion, and the foreign housing deduction are based on foreign earned income. For this purpose, foreign earned income is income you receive for services you perform in a foreign country during a period your tax home is in a foreign country and during which you meet either the bona fide residence test or the physical presence test.

Earned income is pay for personal services performed, such as wages, salaries,or professional fees. The list that follows classifies many types of income into three categories. The column headed Variable Income lists income that may fall into either the earned income category, the unearned income category, or partly into both. For more information on earned and unearned income, see Earned and Unearned Income, below.

www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Foreign-Earned-Income-Exclusion—What-is-Foreign-Earned-Income

Hope that you find the above enclosed information useful. 05/14/2013

What do you think? Answer below!